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Smith College Museum of Art, Exhibits

February 22 - March 16

The Light of The Whole Universe: Through December 31, 2019. The works in the gallery are largely from the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. The period was defined by the civil rights and feminist movements in the U.S. Plastic Entanglements: Through July 28, 2019. The exhibition Plastic Entanglements brings together sixty works by thirty contemporary artists to explore the environmental, aesthetic, and technological entanglements of our ongoing love affair with this paradoxical, infinitely malleable substance.

The Light of The Whole Universe

Through December 31, 2019. The works in the gallery are largely from the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. The period was defined by the civil rights and feminist movements in the U.S. and by anti-colonial and independence movements around the world, including the two-decade long Vietnam War.

While artists like Charles White and Wadsworth Jarrell saw figuration as a way to advance political and social causes, others, such as Alma Thomas, Sam Gilliam, Joan Mitchell, Ibrahim El-Salahi, and James Suzuki, embraced abstraction. Whether they made figurative or abstract art, these artists worked both in and against modern art at a time when positions of power and influence were predominantly occupied by white, straight, and Euro-American men.

New materials developed during World War II (1939–45) also transformed art in these decades. For example, Philadelphia’s Rohm and Haas (now The Dow Chemical Company) applied lessons gleaned from one of its wartime acrylic products—Plexiglas—to develop acrylic paint. The invention of this highly saturated, quick drying, plastic-based paint, employed by Alma Thomas, Helen Frankenthaler, and Sam Gilliam, radically changed the way artists worked once it became commercially available in the 1950s.

The use of translucent plastics by Fred Eversley, Larry Bell, and Louise Nevelson in addition to experiments with the shape and finish of metals by Michelangelo Pistoletto, Donald Judd, and John Chamberlain show just some of the ways artists exploited the creative potential of these new materials.

Artists: Mary Bauermeister, Larry Bell, John Chamberlain, Chryssa, Fred Eversley, Helen Frankenthaler, Sam Gilliam, Grace Hartigan, Wadsworth Jarrell, Donald Judd, Mishima Kimiyo, Joan Mitchell, Elizabeth Murray, Louise Nevelson, Irene Rice Pereira, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Ibrahim El-Salahi, Robert Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Alma Thomas and Charles White.

Image credit: Alma Thomas, American, 1891–1978. Morning in the Bowl of Night, 1973. Acrylic on canvas. Purchased with the Hillyer-Mather-Tryon Fund, the Madeleine H. Russell, class of 1937, Fund, the Kathleen Compton Sherrerd, class of 1954, Acquisition Fund for American Art and the Dorothy C. Miller, class of 1925, Fund. Image courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY

Plastic Entanglements: Ecology, Aesthetics, Materials
February 8–July 28, 2019

Smith College Museum of Art

This is a major loan exhibition. The story of plastic is as complex as the polymer chains that make up its unique material properties. The exhibition Plastic Entanglements brings together sixty works by thirty contemporary artists to explore the environmental, aesthetic, and technological entanglements of our ongoing love affair with this paradoxical, infinitely malleable substance.

temp 7 20 19 scma

Both miraculous and malignant, ephemeral yet relentlessly present, plastic infiltrates our global networks, our planet, and even our bodies.

temp 8 1 19 scma plastic entanglements

Image: Aurora Robson, Ona, 2014, Plastic debris (PET + HDPE), aluminum rivets, tinted polycrylic and mica powder. Courtesy of the artist.

INSTALLATION: The Bagshare Project—Creative Reuse in Action

Smith College Campus Center Nolen Art Lounge (100 Elm St)

From March 08–April 08, 2019

BagShare Project volunteers transform locally sourced surplus materials into reusable bags. Leni Fried, local artist and printmaker, founded The Bagshare Project in 2007 in Cummington, MA. Since then over 30,000 reusable bags have been made by volunteers and shared in stores and food pantries. This installation tells the story of the project and its environmental impact—and invites you to take action!

Details

Start:
February 22
End:
March 16

Venue

Smith College Museum of Art
20 Elm Street at Bedford Terrace
Northampton, MA 01063
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Phone:
(413) 584-2760
Website:
www.smith.edu/artmuseum